The National Gallery of Art’s Afro-Atlantic Histories Is Our History

- Sarah Marloff


Vice President Kamala Harris introduces the National Gallery of Art’s latest exhibit: “This is world history, and it is American history. And, for many of us, it is also family history.”

Background


Afro-Atlantic Histories is a groundbreaking exhibition. Opening to the public on Sunday, April 10, the National Gallery of Art’s highly anticipated exhibitfeatures more than 130 works that seek to tell the complex histories of the African Diaspora from the 17th century onward.

Calling the exhibit “extraordinary,” Harris motioned to the room, arms wide: “This is world history, and it is American history. And, for many of us, it is also family history,” she said. “Yet this history is rarely taught in our schools or shown in our museums.”

The celebrations for Afro-Atlantic Histories are just getting started. On April 30, the museum will host a daylong festival of music, art, and foods from cultures of the African Diaspora. An ongoing film series in relation to the exhibit will run through mid-July, and concerts—including one by Okaidja Afroso Trio on April 24—are among the many upcoming events.